Lights! Travel! Action!

Ah, show biz – the film industry. How many times have we laughed, cried or been at the edge of our seat glued to every moment on the screen? A good movie or show will do just that. They have the ability to draw us in and captivate our minds. Films can teach or entertain. They can give us an escape for a while from reality or show us a reality that we’d never be exposed to by normal circumstances. Movies and shows can allow us to walk along side characters and experience their world and surroundings. Films can take us into the possible future of whisk us into the medieval past. This is just an outer perspective. What’s it like though to actually play out these roles and make them come to life for others to share and be captivated and enthralled by?
One often dreams of being in far off lands, seeing and experiencing different cultures. Many children being a bit extroverted can parlay well into an acting career from child thru to adult. There’s no real age limit to acting. Acting was a natural thing for one of the BV305 brothers and he wanted nothing more than to at least be a part of something big, possibly a memorable or timeless production – another Lord of The Rings per say or in an epic franchise like the Marvel series of films. For many it’s difficult to get out there and break into the field of acting. This Bearded Villain chose to throw himself out there and see what happened. He began by picking up extra roles here and there here in Miami, all the while seeing the whole process of how things are put together and filmed. FaceTime on screen is the key in the industry and the more FaceTime you can get, and doing well in front of the camera, the better your chances are at landing yourself larger and more interactive parts. Through this process he found myself on a plane across the world to Thailand.
Thailand is a beautiful country, but it is also a country of extremes. You have extreme poverty right outside of an 8 story Mega mall with technology, fashion, and goods that haven’t fully hit our own market here in the States. Tourism has shaped a good amount of the country but it was also so fascinating to see how in unison the people were. They weren’t afflicted by the vanity bug that plagues us here. Everyone driving seemed like a thousand little ants all knowing what the other was doing. There were no accidents that occurred or narrowly happened, although just from driving around there; if it were back home; there would have been road rage and accidents galore.
Back to the reason he was in Thailand in the first place. Our brother was there to film as an extra on an independent show being shopped to Netflix as a series on Human trafficking. The producers had already done scenes in New York, LA, and Miami. Bangkok is quite inundated with the street walker – and not all of them are GIRLS! The goal was to capture the authenticity of the situation despite it being a fictional show. The producers liked his work so much they wrote him into the remainder of the pilot as a main character. Very exciting stuff, and works great for his “reel” or acting resume. They finished filming ahead of schedule which allowed him to really take in the culture while there. He visited many of the Temples and blessed while meditating with monks. Growing up in martial arts, he also decided to train Muay Thai with some serious masters in the art. Pretty brutal when you actually learn the from people the art originated from and not the watered down version we see here. He ventured the markets and tried their wares – Scorpions! He even went so far as to get a traditional tattoo as an added reminder of his experience and time spent. It was an amazing experience over all.
Acting is also taking him to Ireland as well to film as an extra on the History Channel’s Vikings TV series as well as Norway to play a role in another Viking-like independent film as well. He’s traveling the world, seeing new cultures and experiencing different aspects of life he’d never do otherwise being here in Miami unless he took a vacation to these places. He took the the risk and made the jump.
Ultimately, the moral of my story is to chase your dreams no matter what they are. Live life as best you can. Life is too short to not take a chance on something that can really be of worth and make you happy. The truth of the saying “Love what you do and you’ll never work a day in your life” is resounding. We should all strive to enrich our lives in whatever way our heart and desires take us. Live with no regrets and don’t look back…you’re not going that way. On that note I’m gonna say “That’s a wrap!”

Written and edited by: Bryon “Shagnus” Chagnon

February has 28 days… But why?

Thirty days hath November, April, June, and September. February has 28 alone. All the rest have 31. This popular rhyme has been around since the 1500s. But, has anyone ever took the time to find out why February has only 28 days? It’s not something they teach in school. What mysteries lie in the month of February? What secrets does this short month keep?

Well, to make this story short… It’s the Romans’ fault. Our modern calendar is loosely based on their old, confusing one. Though records on the Roman calendar are sparse and sketchy at best, legend has it that Romulus, the first king of Rome, devised a 10-month lunar calendar that began at the spring equinox in March and ended with December.

Martius: 31 days
Aprilius: 30 days
Maius: 31 days
Junius: 30 days
Quintilis: 31 days
Sextilis: 30 days
September: 30 days
October: 31 days
November: 30 days
December: 30 days

Tally up those numbers, and you’ll see a problem—the year is only 304 days long. Back then, winter was a nameless, month-less period that no one cared for much. (Planters and harvesters used the calendar as a timetable. To them, winter was useless and wasn’t worth counting.) So for 61 days out of the year, Romans could ask “What month is it?” and you could correctly answer, “None!”

Rome’s second king, (King Numa Pompilius) decided to make the calendar more accurate by syncing it up with the actual lunar year (which is about 354 days). Pompilius added on two months(January and February) after December to account for the new days. The Romans believed even numbers were unlucky, so Numa tried to make each month odd. But to reach the quota of 355, one month had to be even. February ended up pulling the short stick, probably because it was simply the last month on the list. Numa’s calendar ended up looking like this:

Martius: 31 days
Aprilius: 29 days
Maius: 31 days
Iunius: 29 days
Quintilis: 31 days
Sextilis: 29 days
September: 29 days
October: 31 days
November: 29 days
December: 29 days
Ianuarius: 29 days
Februarius: 28 days

Of course, a 355-day calendar had its bugs. After a few years went by, the seasons and months would fall out of sync. So to keep things straight, the Romans had the brilliant idea to “occasionally” insert a 27-day leap month called Mercedonius. The Romans would erase the last couple days of February and start the leap month on February 24th. This caused headaches everywhere. The leap month was inconsistent, mainly because Rome’s high priests determined when it would arrive. Not only did they insert Mercedonius haphazardly, but the priests (being basically politicians at the time) abused the power, using it to extend the terms of friends and trim the terms of enemies.

In around 45 B.C., Julius Caesar commissioned an expert to put aside the lunar origins of the Roman calendar and make it sun-based, like the Egyptian one. Caesar added 10 days to the calendar year and an extra day in February every four years. (The leap-year day was inserted after the 23rd, the same time as the old intercalary month.) Now, the year averaged out to 365.25 days, very close to the actual average length of a year: 365.2425 days (and even that varies). But in order to get Rome on track with the Julian Calendar, the year 46 BCE had to be 445 days long!

After that, the world favored a 365 day calendar. And here we are over 2019 years later, still using the same calendar. At least… For now.

Written by Victor Fonseca
Ig: everyone_hates_victorfonseca

Up ↑

Loading cart ...